Business and Marketing Authorities, Experts and Masters

Last week’s article asked the question “Would you hire yourself?” from the standpoint of, are you really qualified to do all the things your website (or promo emails) state you can.

And we received several comments in response and one in particular inspired today’s article around how we define “authorities”, “experts” and “masters”. After all, I call myself a “Small Business Growth and Marketing Expert” and it got me to wondering if I’ve earned the title.

Out came the dictionary:

  • An “authority” is defined as “an accepted source of information, advice” while
  • An “expert” is defined as “a person who has special skill or knowledge in some particular field” and
  • A “master” is defined as “a person eminently skilled in something, as an occupation or science.

And I thought about all the entrepreneurs who avoid the question altogether by selecting titles such as “maven”, “goddess”, “coach”, “mentor”, etc. Titles which either have no standard definition when it comes to business or which cover all ranges of a skill set.

We’d be remiss without mentioning those titles which indicate how much revenue someone’s made from their clients: “millionaire this” or “multimillionaire that”.

Nothing wrong with it… just food for thought.

Let’s look at it from the business owner’s standpoint…

  • How to choose a title which fairly and accurately represents our expertise/focus and yet also stands out from a branding standpoint?
  • And if you’re new in business, what can you say about that?
  • And from a prospective client’s point of view…
  • Who to trust? If titles mean nothing (and given that anyone can declare themselves anything, they really don’t mean much), whom do you trust?
  • Read testimonials, check out credentials, review experience, speak with prospective vendor to see if you click, etc.

MY REQUEST TO YOU

Ask yourself the following:

  • Are you happy with your “title”?
  • Does it fairly represent who you are, what you focus on or what your level of expertise is?
  • Do/Will your clients “get it” or do you have to explain your business?
  • If you’re calling yourself an “expert” or a “master”, can you back it up? For example, while I can easily back up calling myself a “small business and marketing expert”, I’m not comfortable calling myself a “master” (yet)

And if you’re not happy or comfortable with your title, now’s the time to change it and/or plan what you want to do in 2012 to upgrade your skill set (or choose another field).

Sandra Martini is the founder of SandraMartini.com, a boutique consulting services company helping small business owners around the world accomplish their missions without sacrificing their lives. As an inspiring and in-demand mentor, trainer and speaker, Sandy has helped hundreds of small business owners across the globe create sustainable businesses which make a positive impact. Sandy is also the founder of Escalator Marketing, creating client engagement and raving fans by design. Sandy’s Done 4 You services, programs, products and presentations on Escalator Marketing and creating lifetime clients through Extreme Client Care have made her an in-demand and innovative expert.

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About amritha

Amritha is a Chief Marketing Officer for reputed organisation and author of several publications on Business Journals online and magazines also . She is a regular contributor to online article sites on the topics of business and Finance for New startups to help upcoming innovative entrepreneurs.
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